Vaccine Information: M-M-R II (Page 4 of 5)

Use With Other Vaccines

M-M-R II should be given one month before or after administration of other live viral vaccines.

M-M-R II has been administered concurrently with VARIVAX® [Varicella Virus Vaccine Live (Oka/Merck)], and PedvaxHIB® [Haemophilus b Conjugate Vaccine (Meningococcal Protein Conjugate)] using separate injection sites and syringes. No impairment of immune response to individually tested vaccine antigens was demonstrated. The type, frequency, and severity of adverse experiences observed with M-M-R II were similar to those seen when each vaccine was given alone.

Routine administration of DTP (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis) and/or OPV (oral poliovirus vaccine) concurrently with measles, mumps and rubella vaccines is not recommended because there are limited data relating to the simultaneous administration of these antigens.

However, other schedules have been used. The ACIP has stated “Although data are limited concerning the simultaneous administration of the entire recommended vaccine series (i.e., DTaP [or DTwP], IPV [or OPV], Hib with or without Hepatitis B vaccine, and varicella vaccine), data from numerous studies have indicated no interference between routinely recommended childhood vaccines (either live, attenuated, or killed). These findings support the simultaneous use of all vaccines as recommended.”{62}

HOW SUPPLIED

Product: 50090-1860

REFERENCES

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